Moore-McCormack

Mormacwren

SHIP NAME: Mormacwren (1)

OFFICIAL NO:

SHIP DESIGN:  C2-M

BUILDER:  Sun Yards

                    

KEEL LAID:   August 10, 1938

CHRISTENED BY:  Miss Mary Aldrich. (Daughter of Winthrop W. Aldrich, chairman of the board of the Chase National Bank.)

LAUNCH  DATE:  July 17, 1939

COMPLETION DATE: August 18, 1939

OVERALL LENGTH: 

SPEED:  23 Knots

PASSENGERS:

OUTSTANDING POINTS:  

PRIOR HISTORY: Built new for Moore-McCormack.

SUBSEQUENT HISTORY:  Acquired by the Navy prior to being turned over to Moore-McCormack as Algorab AK 25.

Sold in 1947 as Mongala and scrapped in 1973.

   

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SHIP NAME: Mormacwren (2)

OFFICIAL NO:

SHIP DESIGN:  C1-B

BUILDER:  Consolidated Yards

                    

KEEL LAID:   

CHRISTENED BY: 

LAUNCH  DATE:  1942

COMPLETION DATE:

OVERALL LENGTH: 

SPEED:  23 Knots

PASSENGERS:

OUTSTANDING POINTS:   Served as a troopship 1943-1946

PRIOR HISTORY: Built new for Moore-McCormack.

SUBSEQUENT HISTORY:  After serving as a troopship, she was traded in and used as a down payment on the Brown Victory which was renamed Mormacpine.  The Mormacwren was scrapped in 1965.

   

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SHIP NAME: Mormacwren (3)

OFFICIAL NO:

SHIP DESIGN:  C2-S-B1

BUILDER:  Moore Dry Dock, Oakland, Ca.

                    

KEEL LAID:   

CHRISTENED BY: 

LAUNCH  DATE: 

COMPLETION DATE: June 14, 1944

OVERALL LENGTH: 

SPEED:  23 Knots

PASSENGERS:

OUTSTANDING POINTS:  

PRIOR HISTORY: Built new as the Eagle Wing.

SUBSEQUENT HISTORY:  Acquired by Moore-McCormack in 1947.  Scrapped in 1969.

   

 

(Photo courtesy of Capt. Tom Ellsworth Copyright © 2003-2004 - All rights reserved. Do not reproduce. If anyone wants copies, please email Tom at tbells@cox.net.)

Mormacwren

 

Water Line Model of Mormacwren Water Line Maodel of Mormacwren

Water Line Model from the collection of George "Bob" Aitken, Assistant Vice President of Moore-McCormack.

  (Donated by his son, Samuel Aitken II.)

The Mate Has Pride

("The Mooremack News," WINTER 1954-55)

(Courtesy of John-Paul DeRosa)

 

A Moore-McCormack mate whose memories of the Mormacwren are unusually rich, wrote recently to Emmet J. McCormack, chairman of the board, expressing his chagrin at the sight of what he thought was a Mooremack ship heading for lay-up in the Hudson River at Jones Point.  A check-up indicated that his fears were not well-founded, but his expression of pride in his previous association with the company and with his ship was so well-stated that the NEWS asked—and received—his permission to quote part of his letter.  He wrote as follows:

"Sir, to one who wore the line’s flag on his cap during the days of the Wren, it (the ship heading for lay-up) was not a pleasant sight.  To one who has stood a lonely watch on a wind-swept bridge, who has seen mast tips sweep the stars free of mist for a night; or who, when chilled, could look over his shoulder and see the warm, friendly smoke belching from an 'M'-emblazoned stack, feel warm, too.  To know his ship was on an important assignment—a good ship with a fine company backing it—these things and much more will live always in a sea-faring man’s heart to matter where he might eventually wind up.

"Again I say, no matter where in this world one sees an 'M' on a stack, be it at port, at sea, or in some ship’s graveyard, one sees the best in ships, the best in men, with the honor, prestige, and greatness of a great steamship line.  Perhaps this letter may be regarded as too sentimental; but to a true seaman—to you—I know you accept it as sincere."

B. G. Furey, Chief of Mooremack operations, replied assuring the former mate that the Mormacwren was not at all in the graveyard, that indeed, even as he wrote she had just sailed from Cabedello, Brasil, northbound, with a consignment of coffee.  Reassured, the correspondent wrote again, asking for a picture of the Mormacwren and added a few lines about his wartime days with the company, as follows:

"In those days, when the world went mad and the U.S. Merchant Service was called on to fill the bill, I mingled with sea-faring men of many lines and flags.  And I, with considerable pride in the red 'M' on my cap, plus the two stripes to which I was entitled, felt superior to all of them.  The loads of brass or braid didn’t impress me—Hell, I was Mooremack!  It was that simple."

 

 

 

 

 

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